Thursday, 18 September 2014
Reading David Mack’s Kabuki: Circle of Blood was an entirely new experience for me. Back then, I was firmly in my superhero phase, keen on colourful and shiny art by the likes of Jim Lee and Marc Silvestri. Kabuki’s black and white format and Mack’s style was a bit off putting. Thankfully, I liked the story so much that I was quick to pick up the subsequent series, Skin Deep—where everything changed. Mack left the simple black and white lines behind, weaving magic with a paintbrush and colour instead. The art work blew me away—not merely because it was so beautiful, but because of the way Mack used every inch of the page to delve into the psyche of his character. This was the first time I’d seen a comic that didn’t follow the standard panel-panel-panel-splash page-panel-panel format, and it has become the standard by which I judge creativity when it comes to artists.

Monday, 8 September 2014
Photography is an art I've always been interested in, though not one I personally would take up as a hobby, much less a profession. But I do have a strong appreciation for how other people see things, and their willingness to share that with others. I'm no photography connoisseur, though there are a few professional photographers whose work I love. Patrick Demarchelier has been a long time favourite. His fashion photography is fantastic, though I admit to a bias because he often shot the original supermodels, whom I happen to admire. Demarchelier taught me an appreciation for black and white photography, and I particularly like his celebrity photos. He has this way of capturing them when they are most natural, removing the masks they must put on for red carpets and screen.

I have a number of friends who dabble in the art. One or two do it professionally, while others consider it only a hobby, but the predominant factor with them seems to be that, if they don't have a camera in hand, they are always framing what they see in their minds. I don't know anything about technique, but I can appreciate the different ways they see the world, and thank them for sharing it.

I've recently been introduced to Vivian Maier.
Her story is as compelling as her work, and should be read first, before perusing her gallery, to truly respect it for the magic that it is.

I love the variety to her 'street photography.' Like Demarchelier, she captures the essence of the people, though, most often, they are not celebrities with so much to hide. I love the shapes and angles, the patterns she finds and reveals. The uniqueness and honesty in her "selfies," and the fact that they aren't simply a picture of her. Her switch to colour photography is fascinating, where the colour itself is the subject.

This will sound morbid for obvious reasons, but my favourite photo is the one of the dead cat on the side of the road. From the tire tracks at its hind legs and the pieces of trash strewn across it, it evokes so many thoughts and emotions, not the least of which is the notion that there's someone sitting at home, waiting for their beloved pet to come back. There is beauty in such an image, as there is in the other images of destruction and despair she's taken.

All of her work is amazing. So many stories captured in a single moment in time. Her skill feels a bit like magic to me. As though she somehow could laser focus on that single perfect instant. As if she would walk along a particular path, or stand in a place for a long time to capture the reality of an image she'd already created in her mind.

I am pleased to see the contact sheet gallery on the site. To me, it confirms my feeling that she simply framed the image, pushed the button once, then walked away.  Her images are so confident. Like she didn't feel the need to develop and display them because she probably had every one of those photos already on display in her mind. It may not be the case--perhaps the people who found her negatives in a locker and created this tribute gallery cut out some of the images from the contact sheet, but I'd rather believe this was how she worked. Either way, I love that they put so much effort into understanding her dark room process before ever trying to bring her negatives to light.

Eye of the Beholder

Posted by Wendy B
Wednesday, 3 September 2014
 Beware spoilers for Doctor Who series 8, episodes 1 and 2.

Since my first few steps into the TARDIS, I've managed to watch a few more recommended episodes of Doctor Who here and there, including The Doctor's Wife. I hadn't realizes this episode was written by Neil Gaiman until later, but I can definitely see Gaiman's penchant for writing supporting characters who are far more than what they seem. I've also watched Vincent and the Doctor, which a friend describes as one of the best depictions of the painful relationship between depression and genius.

With my limited Doctoring, I can't really determine which of the recent ones are my favourite. Both David Tennant and Christopher Ecclestone had their merits, but with the introduction of Peter Capaldi as the 12th Doctor, I'm making a commitment.

Prior to Capaldi's first episode, Deep Breath, I paid vague attention to the criticism over his brash nature, and his age, but I'm already impressed with the show for dealing with the latter especially, through (un) subtle commentary about ageism, and prejudice in general.
"You can't see me, can you? You look at me and you can't see me. Do you have any idea what that's like? I'm not on the phone. I'm right here. Standing in front of you.  Please. Just... Just see me."
As far as companions go, I know nothing of Clara. While I can't lay claim to a Doctor, I will give Rose Tyler all my feels.  If I watch many more of the older episodes, it will most likely be for her, though I dread having to watch her departure.

If I'm understanding correctly, the companion is meant to be the Doctor's conscious. Clara is definitely going to need her Jiminy Cricket set to maximum with the 12th Doctor.
In the first episode, he is blunt and filter-free, even with Clara, despite his need of her. Both the current and previous Doctor stress that there is a high level of fear for 12 that makes Clara more important than ever. In Into the Dalek, the fear issue continues, though it becomes clear that this fear, while nebulous, focuses on whether or not he is a good person. This is questionable. In the first episode, it is implied that he kills the robot harvesting human (and dinosaur) body parts to rebuild itself. The robot isn't exactly good, but there is a lot of emphasis placed on whether or not the Doctor is any better. And then the robot ends up in "heaven" with the mysterious Missy. But more on that later.

Back to episode two, the Doctor spends the first half being an asshole, showing no respect for the human lives lost, in deference to the feelings of those who survive them. His reactions are pithy and practical, and he is not at all ignorant of their feelings or why they have them. And he's not unaware of how he comes across, and makes no apologies for it.
"My carer. She cares so I don't have to."
I had begun to question Clara's qualifications as such when she up and bitch slaps him, demanding he be more respectful. He does turn around at that point, and it felt genuine, rather than him simply doing it to appease her. He seems genuine when he makes the promise to the soldier who sacrifices herself (and ends up with Missy). And he seems genuinely wounded when he fails to convert the Dalek into a good Dalek, because the creature sees darkness in him.

We've been promised a darker Doctor with this incarnation, so I'm all for the exploration, especially since my 6yo will be joining me. She'd snuck in to watch earlier episodes with me, but I cut her off during the potentially nightmare inducing Tooth and Claw. After catching the last bit of Into the Dalek, she fervently informed me that she could handle the Doctor. Now she and I can see if my theory is correct about (Mistress) Missy specifically collecting people who sacrifice themselves in order to advance the Doctor's mission at that time, and see how this whole theme of soldiers plays out. Regarding the latter, I was not at all surprised when the soldier asked to join the Doctor,  but am pleasantly intrigued by his refusal...

The Doctor's Darkness

Posted by Wendy B
Monday, 1 September 2014
Last year, I spent Fan Expo helping my friend at her booth, but this year, plans went wonky. Instead, I ended up working the show itself, behind the scenes. I didn't get to see much of the show floor, much less the events. My time on the floor most often looked like this:

Still, it was lots of fun and the good kind of busy, and it was great to see the show in such good hands with the new owners. I've been around since 1998, when my love of anime resulted in the formation of an anime club at university. The club is apparently still running, and my status as first president and co-founder has earned me a legacy. Back then, it brought me to the attention of the Canadian National Comic Book Expo, which was expanding into the realm of anime. Back then, the show barely took up a few rooms at the back of the Metro Toronto Convention Centre south building. It's been pretty impressive to watch it grow bigger every year. A show this size is definitely going to have snags, but I heard a lot of positive feedback along the way, too.

I did get to do a bit of shopping at least. I bought some fuzzy things for my daughters, and began my new obsession, a Funko Pop collection, which  now proudly includes a signed Stan Lee toy. Because this happened!

Due to my job and my location, which was mainly in the south building, I hadn't expected to meet any celebrities, much less Stan Lee himself....

So yeah,

Fan Expo 2014

Posted by Wendy B
Sunday, 24 August 2014
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Wednesday, 20 August 2014
She who used to be the beautiful heaulmière
“Anyone can see a pretty girl. An artist can look at a pretty girl and see the old woman she will become. A better artist can look at an old woman and see the pretty girl she used to be. A great artist can look at an old woman, portray her exactly as she is . . . and force the viewer to see the pretty girl she used to be . . . more than that, he can make anyone with the sensitivity of an armadillo see that this lovely young girl is still alive, prisoned inside her ruined body. He can make you feel the quiet, endless tragedy that there was never a girl born who ever grew older than eighteen in her heart . . . no matter what the merciless hours have done. Look at her, Ben. Growing old doesn’t matter to you and me—but it does to them. Look at her!”

From Stranger in a Strange Land by Robert A. Heinlein

The Beautiful Heaulmière

Posted by Wendy B
Saturday, 16 August 2014
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As heard in The Walking Dead Game: Season 2.
Friday, 15 August 2014
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As heard in Orange is the New Black
Tuesday, 12 August 2014

Posted by Wendy B
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Thursday, 7 August 2014

Batman punched Joker in his stupid grinning face before Twilight Sparkle could stop him.

“Bruce!” she cried as he drew back his fist once more.

“He killed my parents, Twilight,” Batman growled  “And also Jason Todd.”

“No Bruce, the fans killed Jason Todd. You were there. You know this. Plus he’s come back to life so that’s kind of a moot point.”

Batman hesitated long enough to inspire hysterical laughter from the Joker, which Batman silenced by smashing the psychopath’s head against the wall.

“Well, my parents are still dead,” Batman pouted. “You wouldn’t understand. You don’t have parents!”

“Look,” Twilight Sparkle sighed, “We don’t have time for this. Pinkie Pie’s team is preparing our defenses at the Wall,  but it may not be enough to stop the White Walking Dead.  The council is gathering  and Superman is–” Twilight bit her tongue, but it was too late to take back her words. Even though it was Batman that had broken up with Superman, everyone knew the Dark Knight still had feelings for the Man of Steel. Batman just hadn’t expected Superman to get over him so quickly.

“That bastard really didn’t have to post all those damn selfies of him and Diana all over Facebook. “

Twilight threw up her hooves. “Fine. Forget it. Stay here and punch Joker, and wallow in your own darkness all you want. I’ve got a ‘verse to save.”

***

“Bruce is busy,” Twilight grumbled, slumping into her chair. She exchanged knowing glances with Tony Stark and the Winchester brothers.

At the head of the council chamber, Dark Grimhock resumed her motivational speech.  “Lord Voldemort’s made a critical error, and the time for our attack has come. The One Thing must be taken to the forges of Neverland and reforged into the mighty Sword of Omens.”

Optimus Prime transformed and rolled into the council chambers. “How do we plan to do that?”

“Professor Xavier and Gandalf have discovered a secret entrance to the Capitol that is only accessible when the Infinity Stones are in alignment, which, we have learned, will occur before the sun sets on the third day.”

Dark Grimhock’s solemn face grew solemner. “Many Sean Beans died to bring us this information.” She thumped her trident once, and stepped down from the podium.

Mecha Brennan stood, her metal frame and shocking pink boob plates glistening in the artificial light of the twin suns of Sparta. “Hail Hydra,” she said stonily, giving the accompanying rock, paper, lizard, spock salute.

“Black Heimdal is awaiting our signal at the Bifrost,” she began. “He will transport our jaegers beyond the wall. The One Thing will be placed in the trust of the newest members of our committee.”

“And who might they be?” Benedict Cumberbatch said in his sexy Benedict Cumberbatch voice, shortly before he transformed, revealing that he was actually Loki, and then proceeded to repeat those words sexily in his sexy Tom Hiddleston voice.

As if on cue, Lt. O’Brien energized the transporters. When the sparkly sparkles cleared, there stood five of the strangest companions the council had ever seen.

“Who the hell are they?” demanded Tinkerbell.

Star-Lord struck a pose. “We’re the Guardians of the Galaxy, bitches.”

Tuesday, 5 August 2014
Planning on taking a wee one along to a convention? As with any outing involving children, good planning is required to ensure fun is had by all involved. We’ve been taking our daughters, aged six and eight, to Toronto’s FanExpo since our eldest was two months shy of bursting from my womb, and we’ve learned a few things along the way:

Monday, 4 August 2014
Up until last year, The Boneyard topped my list of movies that are so bad that they are awesome. What could possibly be better than a horror movie featuring Phyllis Diller and an eight foot tall zombie poodle?

Why, a tornado full of sharks, of course.

Thursday, 24 July 2014
Apocalypse Parteh

Apocalypse Parteh by nightxade

The end of the world does not mean the end of sexiness. I can survive just fine with corsets, tight jeans and thigh high boots. And pouches. You can never have too many pouches. Also, I owned a katana long before Michonne ever showed up. #HipsterApocalypse 
Tuesday, 22 July 2014
Wednesday, 16 July 2014

My finger is hovering over the pre-order button for Dragon Age: Inquisition, but being a responsible adult, I have not yet committed. It will happen though. No matter how much Bioware has hurt me with tri-coloured endings, missing Wardens and almost everything else about Dragon Age 2, I just can’t quit them. It certainly doesn’t help that they know all the right buttons to push. And by that I mean companions.

Aside from the fact that Bioware is fully embracing the concept of DiversityTM and Strong Female CharactersTM, and totally standing behind their choices, with team members openly shutting down the bigots, their NPCs are always just … awesome. And Bioware knows it.

Subject Zero convinced me to play Mass Effect, thanks to her teaser:
She might not seem like much more than an angry woman child looking to rage out on anything in her way, but getting to know her meant that, by the time I met up with her again in Mass Effect 3, she had made mama so damn proud.

Bioware’s characters are so wonderfully nuanced. Layers upon layers, with rich histories and connections that players can only truly learn by taking the time to talk to them and to listen to what they have to say. Reading their bios isn’t good enough. You have to truly hang out with them to appreciate them. That doesn’t mean players are meant to like all of them. That’s the best part – the characters are so realistic in their quirks and their flaws that everyone can relate to them in some way, for better or for worse. Making the effort to get to know the NPCs can lead to some of the games best moments, and because of Bioware’s obsession with ChoiceTM, the NPCs reactions and interactions can be completely different from playthrough to playthrough, revealing even more about them.

I’m currently playing SWTOR as much for the class stories, as for the companions related to each class. Unfortunately, there are limitations to the amount of interaction the player gets with each of the five companions, but I grasp at those little tidbits of goodness, and am sad when my companions run off on their own personal missions, but don’t invite me along.

It’s fun to compare the companions from one Bioware game to another, because the writers have clearly developed a framework of their own special archetypes. The child-like apprentice-type, who isn’t as naïve as they seem to be. The anarchist. The mother figure. The eager to please. The uncaring. Archetypes typically found in other media as well, but Bioware seems to have developed and branded their own little twists.

Bioware also knows that some of us (lol we are the 99%) are here for the pixelated romance. How many times have I vowed not to romance Alistair, but end up falling for this every time? So why fight it? In fact, with the introduction of Dragon Age: Inquisition’s Dorian Pavus, I am, for the first time ever, making plans to make my legacy character a male. You don’t understand how major a decision this is. Because boys are yucky. They can be nice to look at, but if I have the choice, I prefer to create female characters. I suppose the simple answer is that, being a female, I relate better to female characters. The simpler answer is that, if I’m going to be staring at the same character for 100 hours, I want it to be appealing to my eyes – which leads to the simplest answer: boobies.

Dorian Pavus by Ymirr
But Dorian Pavus fascinates me. I’m not *just* making a male NPC *just* so I can bed the rebellious Tevinter mage, but I know that romance options means even more opportunity to get to know the characters. I’ve also already planned out the rest of my main team, which will be comprised of the following:

Vivienne: Because she is fabulous and will mountain climb in heels because fuck you.

Iron Bull: Because the kossith have developed over the years and we’ve gotten to see them from the more rigid qunari religious aspect. I expect lots of interesting dynamics between him and Dorian, since the kossith have a long history of animosity with the Tevinter.

I’m leaning toward a mage for my first character, though I haven’t spent too much time exploring the class options. I’m more interested in the party dynamics. My second will likely be a rogue, a class I’ve learned to appreciate since Dragon Age: Origins and have honed in Skyrim. This one will likely be a kossith female and I’ll definitely have Cole in party, at least for a few minutes. I know Cole from the book Asunder and was so pleased when he was announced. He’s a ghost of sorts, with physical form that is forgotten if you move away from him, and I’m curious to see how his story continues here.

Save for the latest book, The Masked Empire, I’m all caught up on my back stories, which I know will play into the game. Non-lore hunters won’t be hurt by not reading all the surrounding materials, but for me, it’s almost necessary. When such effort is put into creating a world with such depth, why wouldn’t you go beyond simply killing all the things with fire.

Not that I won’t be killing all the things with fire, mind. I just haven’t paid much attention to the game mechanics. It’s not my main point of interest, and considering I’ve struggled through games with awful and even glitched mechanics just for story purposes (and Kreia), I’m really not worried about Dragon Age: Inquisition causing me any more stress.

Now all I need is Prince to show up in Orlais, and all will be well in my world.
Sunday, 13 July 2014
via Penny Dreadful Quotes

There are many reasons why I have come to like Showtime's Penny Dreadful, not the least of which is the magic of its writing. Some of my favourite quotes...

***

Vanessa: Your father loves you very much and would do anything to save you. But I love you in a different way. I love you enough to kill you.

Dorian: I suppose we all play parts.
Ethan: What's yours?
Dorian: Human.

Vanessa: Is it poisonous?
Dorian: Like all beautiful things, I hope so.

Dorian: What does it say to you?
Vanessa: Touch me with your finger, softly. My scent on your neck. Open your lips. Taste.

Victor: You seek to threaten me with death? If you seek to threaten me, threaten me with life.

Caliban: I learned to stay in the shadows. To protect such a heart as this you gave me.

Ethan: Do you believe in God?
Sembene: I believe in everything.

Vanessa: I think, Mr. Gray, there are... tremors around us. Like the vibrations of a note of music. Hidden music. Some might be more attuned to them than others. What do those people do, those who have been chosen?
Dorian: They endure uniqueness.
Vanessa: To be alien. To be disenfranchised from those around you, is that not a dreadful curse?
Dorian: To be different, to be powerful... is that not a divine gift?
Vanessa: To be alone.
Dorian: To be seeking.
Vanessa: What?
Dorian: Another.
Vanessa: Like you.
Dorian: Who shares your rarity.
Vanessa: Then you are no longer unique.
Dorian: Nor are you alone.

Dorian: Photographs are so ironically impermanent. They capture one moment in time to perfection. A painting can capture eternity.

Dorian: You have exceptional composure.
Vanessa: Do I?
Dorian: Poise, I mean.
Vanessa: Control.
Dorian: Yes. What if you were to abandon this?
Vanessa: I couldn't.
Dorian: Why?
Vanessa: There are things within our soul that can never be unleashed.
Dorian: What would happen if they were?
Vanessa: They would consume us, we would cease to be and another would exist in our place, without control. Without limits.

Vanessa: Don't ask permission. If you want to do a thing, do it because it is your desire, not my allowance. You must risk rejection.

Victor: I believe in a place between Heaven and Hell. Between the living and the dead. A glorious place of everlasting rebirth, perhaps even salvation. Do you believe in such a place? Well, there is a price to pay for such a passage. As there is with all things. I know that you'll pay it easily.

Penny Dreadful Quotes

Posted by Wendy B
Friday, 11 July 2014
To raise the dead is to wield power over the soul. Not the souls of the dead, mind you. To raise a dead thing—to animate the flesh to do your bidding—is to give them a piece of your own soul. Your essence becomes the spark that sustains them and binds them to your will. You see, the souls of the dead do not tarry, but when summoned, whatever remains entwines with the necromancer’s own like black webs seeking, clinging to the life once known. Look into the eyes of the dead and you may yet see that fleeting glimmer of life. But is it the shadow of the dead soul you see, summoned back from the abyss? Or is it the soulspark of the necromancer on which the undead thing feeds? Perhaps something else entirely has been pulled through the veil, for even the most learned necromancer does not truly know what lurks beyond death itself.

Summoning the departed is the most intimate of rituals. In an instant, you will know them—know what they were when they lived. It is as if you wear their skin like it were not quite your own. You feel the echo of a once beating heart, the feather touch of ghost blood flowing through veins, hear the whispers of their thoughts, their dreams, their memories. An unskilled mage should never attempt to raise the newly dead, for all of these things are too close to the surface, waiting to draw you down. Often, the newly dead have not yet come to accept that they no longer have a place amongst the living but by the necromancer’s command. They are the most difficult to control for their appetite for life can be voracious, consuming a novice necromancer whole and leaving only an empty wraith in their place. Such a creature must be destroyed, for they are a void—a breach in the veil through which the dead can cross unbidden.

A necromancer proves their true skill, not in who or how many they can summon back from the final darkness, but in how many they can release before the dead souls bind to their own, nibbling away at the life that sustains them. But even the dead that are released—through destruction or by the necromancer’s command—still take something of their master back with them into the depths.

That is, if the necromancer chooses to release them at all…

Soul binder

Posted by Wendy B
Thursday, 10 July 2014
Sometimes all it takes to get me hooked on a new obsession is the smallest taste. Tease me with striking visuals, and I'll make a trip to the comic book store. Whisper me an enticing quote, and I will just-one-more-chapter a book into the small hours of the night. Lure me in with a fascinating character, and I'll sell my soul to Bioware.

The latter is how I came to meet Job, thanks to a friend who knows my buttons and can feed my addictions.

Banshee isn't about Job, though Job is fucking awesome. It's about Lucas Hood. Actually, it's about the guy who, after leaving prison, escaping one of the best chases scenes ever, getting into a bar fight that results in dead bad guys and a dead sheriff, takes the new sheriff's badge and name and makes himself comfy in the town of Banshee, where the love of his life and former partner-in-crime, and daughter of the incredibly dangerous mob boss, Rabbit, is trying to hide from their past. Throw in the threat of Rabbit's return due to some missing diamonds and a few vendettas, animosity between the various cultural groups residing in and around town, including Amish and First Nations, and you get a big soup of amazing television.

Sordid details aside, this show is just the perfect example of excellent storytelling combined with amazing acting and cinematography. The latter reminds me of some of my favourite Steven Soderbergh scene work, particularly in Out of Sight. Movement is often cut or stuttered, with scenes transitioning almost like panels in a comic book. It knows the value of heating a moment with silence, allowing the actors to ground scenes in raw emotion right down to the very last second (read: stay for the credits).

Unlike Out of Sight, Banshee is not subtle. Or rather, it is subtle in many, many ways, but not when it comes to sex and violence. But unlike the sex and violence in some shows on some stations that are all about viewer ratings first, neither is about mere titillation. Every scene in Banshee serves a purpose to advance the story and characters, not just to entertain. This is a bit surprising to me, since Banshee comes from creators of True Blood, a show that seems only to serve that purpose, and, with its last season upon us, appears to have forgotten the entire concept of storytelling altogether. Anyway, Banshee literally pulls no punches when it comes to its violence, with Lucas Hood at the forefront as a sheriff ready to solve every case with his fists.

These fights are not for the squeamish. They are very realistic and often leave me cringing. But they are true to the characters--because Hood isn't the only one capable of such violence. There are a number of characters who can hold their own, sometimes quite surprisingly--and the show never fails to deliver when it unleashes them. But I stress, every fucking and every fucking up is pivotal. And some of them have even left me in tears because of the heart and soul behind them, which we learn even as the blood flies. I particularly love the way many of these scenes are shot, with some of them juxtaposed against others. The latter link in particular is amazing for so many reasons that I can't get into because SPOILARZ! But if you choose not to clicky, I will reveal that it features two of the main female characters in separate battles, dealing with their shit.

Because, like I said, everyone can hold their own in Banshee. Everyone has their issues, their vulnerabilities, their strengths. And it is so incredible to see an ensemble cast where everyone is on equal footing, with the women not having to be called out as kick ass GRRL POWER. They simply are, like the men, doing what they have to do in the situations they are given or get themselves into.

Following my season one binge, I discovered Banshee Origins, vignettes providing a tiny peek into the history behind the characters. More shows need to do origin episodes like this--but only if they understand the power of "less is more," like Banshee does.

Hmmm... and now I see that IDW Publishing has taken the Banshee Origins phenomenon one step further with a comic book. Do I dare take my obsession to the next level? I'm actually of two minds about this because, while I do want to know more, the magic of Banshee is in what it doesn't tell or show. Even with the Origins shorts, there is only just enough to make you be like oooooooh, while still leaving the mystery firmly in place.


I shall report in anon.

Oh, almost forgot to mention the soundtrack. A lot of shows use music to set a scene, and Banshee isn't unique in that. But since the show is already doing everything right for me, it's not surprising that my music box is frequently getting an update. The latest? "Hope" by Abi Wade.

Screaming about Banshee

Posted by Wendy B
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Tuesday, 8 July 2014
Monday, 23 June 2014
Steam Logo Last year, my husband saw me playing Saints Row the Third and promptly bought it on Steam for himself. At full price. I had to shake my head. Steam sales happen too often to ever justify paying full price on Steam for a video game. If a game on your wish list isn't on sale, just whisper your desires to your preferred social media platform and by some sort of space magic, you'll soon receive a polite email from Steam letting you know that your wish has been granted. And when Christmas and summer roll around, hand over your wallet and abandon all hope. Because there is no resisting the call of the mighty Steam Sale.

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What is this?

This is my mindspill. Mostly about comics, books, video games, movies of the science fiction and fantasy leanings. Sometimes recipes and parenting stuff will sneak in, along with a real world rant or two. Previous mindspills hung out at Livejournal, this is where I sometimes flail and random wtf is over here.

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